Brian Lau

About Brian Lau

Brian Lau, AP, C.SMA is has been on the faculty of the Sports Medicine Acupuncture Certification since 2014, and also teaches foundation courses with AcuSport Education. Brian lives and practices in Tampa, FL where he owns and operates Ideal Balance: Center for Sports Medicine Acupuncture (www.ideal-balance.net). He blogs on anatomy and TCM at www.sinewchannels.com.

Exercise Prescription for the Acupuncturist — Elevated Ilium and Medial Knee Pain: A Channel Sinew Perspective

By |December 2nd, 2020|Corrective Exercises/Intradermal Needles, Sports Medicine Acupuncture and Injuries|

Figure 1. The practitioner places both hands over the highest point of each ilium and observes the relative hand placement to determine if there is an elevated ilium. Rehabilitative exercise is a comprehensive science based on a

What Is Sports Acupuncture?

By |November 3rd, 2020|Business & Practice, Featured, Sports Medicine Acupuncture and Injuries|

  Sports acupuncture is a non-defined general term used by many practitioners who apply acupuncture to treat activity or sports-related injuries. The principle behind this term is based solely on the practitioner’s own experience in either “sports” or “acupuncture.” Currently, there is no regulatory

The Sternocleidomastoid Muscle & Its Channel Relationships

By |July 2nd, 2020|Channel Sinews (Jingjin)|

Fig. 1 The Sternocleidomastoid muscle The sternocleidomastoid muscle (Fig. 1) is frequently involved with a host of issues that bring patients into an acupuncture clinic. This muscle is a major contributor to muscle tension headaches, but also

Patient Self-Care for Balancing the Lung Sinew Channel (Jingjin)

By |May 5th, 2020|Channel Sinews (Jingjin)|

Fig. 1: Patient has shortened LU Jingjin with an anterior scapular tilt This blog post will look at the influence of the myofascial plane of the Lung sinew channel (jingjin) on the position of the scapula and, therefore, its involvement with injuries

Telemedicine Guide: A Low Back Pain Case Study

By |April 9th, 2020|Case Studies, Featured|

This article and the accompanying video are meant to share our experience with developing, designing and working through the logistical issues of a telemedicine consultation. Our goal is to help practitioners learn a different way to help their patients during these challenging

Pericardium and Lung Channel Sinew and Scapular Position

By |November 6th, 2019|Channel Sinews (Jingjin)|

This blog post is a summary of some of the information Brian Lau, L.Ac., C.SMA recently presented at the Atlantic Symposium in New Jersey this past October 5th. The presentation was on postural assessment, the channel sinews and the zangfu — specifically the pericardium

Anatomy of SP 4 (Gongsun) and Balance of the Medial Arch

By |August 1st, 2019|Acupoints & Motor Points|

This blog post on the anatomy of SP 4 contains an image and a video from cadaver labs in the Sports Medicine Acupuncture Certification program. These are for medical professionals only and its use is strictly for educational purposes. Do not share these with

An Analysis of the Channel Imbalances Associated with Patellofemoral Syndrome

By |December 3rd, 2018|Channel Sinews (Jingjin)|

In Sports Medicine Acupuncture®, we emphasize an integrated model, incorporating the best from the traditions of Western Orthopedics/Sports Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Maybe we learn about trigger points and then everything we see is through the lens of trigger point referral patterns. Or,

Medial Epicondylitis and the Heart Channel Sinews

By |October 31st, 2018|Channel Sinews (Jingjin)|

Medial epicondylitis frequently occurs in activities that require repetitive shortening and lengthening (eccentric and concentric) contractions of the wrist flexors, which occur in activities of daily living, as well as in golf and throwing sports. Avid rock climbers, in whom this condition is referred

Neck and Rhomboid Pain: A Sinew Channel Approach

By |June 27th, 2018|Channel Sinews (Jingjin)|

Neck and rhomboid pain is a frequent patient complaint. A common cause of this pain is entrapment of the dorsal scapular nerve. Clinical symptoms include muscle weakness and pain in the muscles it innervates: the levator scapula and rhomboids. Fig 1: Pain in

Go to Top